HAPPY HEARTS!

February is the month of sweethearts, love and Valentine’s.  The heart symbol is often used this month as a symbol of love and affection but did you know that February is also the official month set aside by the American Heart Association as American Heart Month?

Several companies have “red out” days and many celebrities dress in red, as well, to bring awareness to this sometimes silent killer – heart disease.  An estimated 44 million women in the U.S. alone are affected by cardiovascular disease and 90% of women have one or more risk factors for heart disease and don’t even know it.

This month’s blog focuses on keeping your heart happy and healthy.  Check out the recipes, exercises, tips, warnings and more to help you to know more about your heart and heart health.
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Top 10 Healthy Heart Tips

Courtesy of www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Healthyhearts

A healthy lifestyle will make your heart healthier. Check out the link below for the top 10 things you can do to look after your heart:
http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Healthyhearts/Pages/Healthy-heart-tips.aspx
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7 Surprising Heart Disease Risks
Courtesy of www.besthealthmag.ca by: Lisa Bendall

It’s well-known that fatty foods, smoking and inactivity are risk factors for heart disease. But new research has revealed some other risks that may surprise you.

  1. Know your blood type? According to the Harvard School of Public Health, people with type A, B or AB blood – that’s over half the population – have a slightly higher risk of heart disease compared to those with type O blood. In a new study, type A blood boosted the risk by five percent, type B by 11 percent and type AB by 23 percent. Researchers at the Department of Nutrition aren’t sure why the differences exist, but there’s evidence that type O blood may flow better and clot less, and other types may be higher in bad cholesterol.
  2. Sleep Apnea – Scientists are uncovering more and more evidence that sleep apnea, a disorder in which breathing periodically stops during sleep, is strongly linked to cardiovascular disease. It’s not easy to sort out cause and effect, especially when people with sleep apnea are more likely to have other risk factors for heart disease like obesity and diabetes. But doctors recently found that when sleep apnea was treated, odds of cardiovascular death returned to normal.
  3. Early menopause – It was recently found that women who go through menopause early – before age 46 – have double the odds of heart attack or stroke compared to women who experience menopause when they’re older. Although this doesn’t mean menopause causes cardiovascular disease – the women in the early-menopause group were also more likely to have other risk factors like high BMI, diabetes and history of smoking.
  4. Healthy weight but unhealthy belly – Obesity is a well-known risk factor for heart disease. But recent Mayo Clinic research shows that people who have a perfectly normal weight can be at an even greater risk of death than obese people – if, that is, their waist-to-hip ratio happens to be high. Lesson learned: Don’t assume your heart is healthy just because your body mass index (BMI) is low. If you have fat around your belly, that’s a risk factor to take seriously.
  5. Shift Work – People who do shift work are 23 percent more likely to have a heart attack than those who don’t.  One possible reason for the risk: This kind of work schedule wreaks havoc on the body’s circadian rhythm.
  6. History of child abuse – According to new research from the American Psychological Association, middle-aged women who remember being physically abused in childhood are at an increased risk for cardiovascular problems. In the study, these women were twice as likely as other women their age to have high blood pressure, high blood sugar, a bigger waistline and unhealthy cholesterol levels, which translate into a higher risk for heart disease. It’s possible that childhood trauma can lead to higher stress and poor diet, even decades later.
  7. Low Vitamin D – a study following over 10,000 people found evidence that low levels of vitamin D are linked to significantly higher rates of heart disease, heart attack and death. Researchers aren’t sure whether vitamin D deficiency actually leads to heart disease or is just an indicator of poor health, although they’re already working on the answer.
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GIFT CARD FOR YOUR SWEETHEART:
 
Benefit Personal Training has gift cards available for Valentine’s Day!  Give your sweetie the gift of fitness and a healthy heart.  Available in any dollar amount.
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Exercises of the Month: 6 Best Exercises for Heart Health
1.  Circuit Training
Any movement is better than sitting still when it comes to improving your heart health, but one of the best types of exercises to increase your cardiovascular fitness is circuit training. When you work out at a very high intensity, the blood starts to pump harder and that challenges the elasticity of the arterial wall; it sort of stretches the arteries and improves the elasticity for better cardiovascular fitness. Alternating between upper and lower body exercises (with minimal rest periods) is the ideal way to get maximum results.

2. Lane Swimming

Hit the pool for your heart (and lungs).  Lane swimming will give you a greater return on your exercise time investment than leisure swimming. Try progressing from 8 to 12 lengths of the pool per swim technique, varying techniques on different days. This could mean doing front crawl and legs only with a flutter board one day and then back crawl and breaststroke another day, etc.

3. Weight Training
Weight training is critical for people with heart disease.  In addition to building muscle mass, which will help you burn fat, weight training is also good for bone health and your heart. When it comes to deciding what type of weight training to do, using your own body weight, machines or free weights can be extremely effective. However, to continue progress, try adjusting the tempo of your movements and heaviness of weights to increase the difficulty as needed.  Getting help from a certified personal trainer can be helpful to keep you safe and on track.
4. Running  
A steady run is obviously an excellent way to stay in shape and is good for the heart but running intervals will really push your cardiovascular fitness to the next level. Whether it is sprints or hills, all you need is 10 seconds at a time (ensuring you go all out). This type of training will deplete some of the glycogen or carbohydrate stored in the muscle, allowing you to tap into stored fat more readily. Bonus!
5.  Yoga

You don’t have to be doing a high level of activity to increase your heart health.  At first glance, yoga may not seem like an obvious heart health activity, but it is. Yoga is great for strength and muscle toning, plus more active styles of yoga such as Ashtanga and Bikram can offer cardiovascular benefits, as your heart rate is elevated throughout the class.
6.  Cycling 
Regular cycling can substantially reduce your risk for coronary heart disease, according to a large study done by the British Medical Association. The findings revealed that cycling 32 kilometres a week reduced the potential to develop heart disease by a whopping 50 percent. Cycling uses large muscle groups in the legs to elevate your heart rate, which helps to improve not only your cardiovascular fitness but also burns calories, and has even been shown to improve mental health.
Tip: No matter what exercise you choose to do, 30 minutes, five days a week is an ideal place to start.  Try to build up to one hour, five days a week for optimum heart healthy benefits.
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Recipes of the Month: Halibut w/ Sugar Snap Pea Salad &  Spanish Chicken and Rice
Courtesy of realsimplefood.com
 
+ 50 other heart healthy recipes here:
These flavorful, easy recipes have an added bonus-they’re good for your heart, too.
Halibut with Sugar Snap Pea Salad
INGREDIENTS:
  • 1 Tablespoon fresh lime juice
  • teaspoon grated fresh ginger
  • tablespoons olive oil
  • kosher salt and black pepper
  • 12 ounces sugar snap peas (4 cups), strings removed
  • small red onion, thinly sliced
  • tablespoon sesame seeds, toasted (optional)
  • 6-ounce pieces halibut fillet
  • lime, cut into wedges

DIRECTIONS:

  1. In a large bowl, combine the lime juice, ginger, 1 tablespoon of the oil, and ¼ teaspoon each salt and pepper.
  2. Add the snap peas, onion, and sesame seeds, if desired, and toss to coat.
  3. Heat the remaining tablespoon of oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat.
  4. Season the fish with ½ teaspoon salt and ¼ teaspoon pepper. Cook until opaque throughout, 3 to 5 minutes per side.
  5. Serve with the salad and lime wedges—————————————————————————————————

Spanish Chicken and Rice
INGREDIENTS:
  • 1 TABLESPOON OLIVE OIL
  • 1 POUND BONELESS, SKINLESS CHICKEN BREASTS, CUT INTO 2½-INCH PIECES
  • KOSHER SALT AND PEPPER
  • 1 MEDIUM ONION, SLICED
  • 1 GREEN BELL PEPPER, SLICED
  • 2 CLOVES GARLIC, FINELY CHOPPED
  •  1 CUP DRY WHITE WINE SUCH AS SAUVIGNON BLANC)
    – 1 CUP OF CHICKEN BROTH CAN REPLACE WINE AS AN EVEN HEALTHIER RECIPE
  • 1 28-OUNCE CAN DICED TOMATOES, WITH JUICE
  • 1 CUP LONG-GRAIN WHITE RICE
  • 1 CUP FROZEN PEAS
  • ¼ CUP FRESH FLAT-LEAF PARSLEY, ROUGHLY CHOPPED
  • ¼ CUP PIMIENTO-STUFFED SPANISH OLIVES, CHOPPED (OPTIONAL)

DIRECTIONS:

  1. IN A LARGE SAUCEPAN, HEAT THE OIL OVER MEDIUM HEAT. PAT THE CHICKEN DRY WITH PAPER TOWELS. SEASON WITH ½ TEASPOON SALT AND ¼ TEASPOON PEPPER.
  2. COOK THE CHICKEN UNTIL GOLDEN BROWN, 2 MINUTES PER SIDE. ADD THE ONION AND BELL PEPPER AND COOK, STIRRING OCCASIONALLY, UNTIL SOFT, ABOUT 5 MINUTES. ADD THE GARLIC AND COOK, STIRRING, FOR 1 MINUTE.
  3. ADD THE WINE (OR CHICKEN BROTH), TOMATOES AND JUICE, RICE, ½ TEASPOON SALT, AND ¼ TEASPOON PEPPER AND BRING TO A BOIL. REDUCE HEAT AND SIMMER, COVERED, FOR 20 MINUTES.
  4. STIR IN PEAS AND COOK, COVERED, UNTIL HEATED THROUGH, ABOUT 2 MINUTES. STIR IN THE PARSLEY.
  5. SPOON THE CHICKEN AND RICE ONTO PLATES. SERVE WITH THE OLIVES, IF DESIRED.

Paula Jamieson

Certified Personal Trainer/Exercise Therapy/Sports & Fitness Nutritionist
Benefit Personal Training

SPOTLIGHT CLIENT OF THE MONTH: DIANA STILLWAGON

This month’s client spotlight is on Diana Stillwagon, a client of our trainer Paula Jamieson. Diana came to us back in January and has been working out with Paula once a week since. Though she was already very fit and active (swims, bikes, runs, kayaks, paddleboards, etc.) Diana was looking to gain some upper body strength to help her swim and also to improve her running time.

Diana had signed up for the Chattanooga Waterfront Sprint Triathlon and she wanted to improve her time and endurance.  Well, on June 26, 2016 not only did she manage to improve her time and endurance, she walked away with First Place in her age group.

Diana's Tri

Just a few short months later, on August 13, 2016, Diana attended the Gatorfest 3.4 Mile Open Water Swim in Augusta where she managed to knock out 2nd place in her age.  She said she felt like she was just gliding along and knocking it out.

Diana 3.5 mile swim - 2nd place

Though she works very hard on her own she has told us that she knows the personal training sessions have helped her step up her workouts and that the strength training and agility drills have definitely attributed to her added success as an athlete.

This Sunday, August 28th, she will be attending the Georgia Peach Women’s Triathlon at Dallas Landing – Lake Allatoona.
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We have no doubt that Diana will rock this event as well and wish her all the best – go get’em girl!!!

Whether you are an athlete looking to enhance your performance or you are a beginner just coming off of the couch, we would love to help you with your fitness and nutritional goals. Feel free to contact us at 770-330-2126 or email info@bodyrich.com.

Paula Jamieson

Certified Personal Trainer, Fitness Nutritionist, Exercise Therapy Specialist

Benefit Personal Training / Bodyrich Fitness Company

 

 

BODYRICH FITNESS COMPANY IS COMING TO SUWANEE!!!

Team Bodyrich is pleased to announce the merger of Bodyrich Fitness Company and Benefit Personal Training!  As part of the merger we will be relocating into Benefit’s private personal training facility.  Benefit is personal training only with no memberships or extended contracts.  You will find the same professional, clean and private environment we have had at Bodyrich.

benefit 1 benefit 2 benefit 3

We are excited about the move and sincerely hope that all our current clients stay with us and continue to workout with your trainer at our new location as well as we welcome anyone who is interested in a personal trainer to come in and check us out.  As always, we offer a complimentary consultation and introductory workout.

Benefit Personal Training is located at 1300 Peachtree Industrial Blvd., Suite 2201, Suwanee, GA 30024 (one traffic light north of Fresh Market) –  5 miles north of our current location in Duluth and 3 miles from Sugarloaf Country Club.

Important dates:  Official start date at Benefit is Monday, June 13th.

If you have any questions or concerns about the merger or if you are looking for help with any area of your fitness and/or nutrition, feel free to contact us at 770-330-2126 or email info@bodyrich.com.

 

Paula Jamieson

Certified Personal Trainer, Fitness Nutritionist, Exercise Therapy Specialist

Bodyrich Fitness Company

www.bodyrichfitness.com

 

LOVE – HATE RELATIONSHIP: THE FOAM ROLLER

Foam rollers are gaining popularity as a tool to make exercise more challenging and to help relieve pain. Many people who have muscle stiffness opt for a massage, but with a foam roller, you can do it yourself. The roller works the same way as a massage, by breaking up the fibrous tissue that has built up so you have better circulation flow, which in turn, reduces soreness. If you use the foam roller after your workout 2 – 3 times a week, you will have less muscle tension and pain. As an added bonus, when you hold your position on the foam roller, which is an unstable surface, you’re contracting your muscles so you’re getting a strength and stability workout at the same time.foam roller 1 foam roller 3

When rolling, roll slowly and avoid holding on any areas that are swollen or extremely irritated – roll near and around these areas instead. Remember that the foam roller is meant for the muscles and connective tissue around the joints, and not for the joint itself, so don’t put the joint directly on the roller. Also remember that the foam roller isn’t a substitute for a doctor when you’re injured. If your muscles or tissues are inflamed, don’t use the foam roller or you could cause more damage to your body.

Here are some core workouts and stretches to try on your foam roller:

  • Instead of doing crunches on the floor, use the foam roller. Sit on the end of the roller and put your feet on the floor. Extend your arms to your sides and slowly roll down, feeling each vertebrae as it touches the roller, then roll yourself back up. Do three sets of 10.
  • Lie on your back on the roller, feet flat on the floor. Hold your arms to your side and lift your right knee to your chest. Hold the position for three seconds then lower your leg. Repeat 9 more times before switching to your left leg. As your abdominal muscles get stronger, you can hold the position longer.
  • Lie on your back on the roller and lift your legs so they are at a 90-degree angle to the floor. Hold your arms out to your sides and slowly lower your right foot to the floor until your toes touch then raise your leg back up to the starting position. Repeat this 9 more times before switching legs.
  • Stand on the roller, feet hip width apart. Bend your knees a little and squeeze your glutes. Hold the position for 60 seconds, keeping your abdominals pulled in. If you need help with stability, do this exercise near a wall so you can reach out your hand to balance.
  • Stand with the foam roller about a foot behind you. Put the toes of your right foot on the roller and slowly do a lunge, allowing the roller to roll to your shin. Pull yourself back up to your starting position and repeat 9 more times before switching legs.
  • Sit in the middle of the roller with your knees bent. Put your arms on the floor behind you. Lift your right leg and cross it over so it is on your left knee. Drop your right leg toward the floor and roll the foam roller down your right outer thigh and glutes then roll back up. Turn your body and roll down your left outer thigh and glutes then roll back up. Do this 4 more times, then cross your left leg over your right knee and repeat the exercise 5 times.

Here are the 5 most common mistakes people make using a foam roller:

Mistake #1: You roll directly where you feel pain. When we feel pain, our first inclination is to massage that spot directly. However, this might be a big mistake. Instead, if you find a spot that’s sensitive, it’s a cue to ease away from that area by a few inches. Take time and work a more localized region around areas that feel sore before using larger, sweeping motions.

Mistake #2: You roll too fast. While it might feel great to roll back and forth on a foam roller quickly, you’re not actually eliminating any adhesions that way. You need to give your brain enough time to tell your muscles to relax. Go slower so that the superficial layers and muscles have time to adapt and manage the compression.

Mistake #3: You spend too much time on those knots. We’re often told that if you feel a knot, spend time working that spot with the foam roller. However, some people will spend five to 10 minutes or more on the same area and attempt to place their entire body weight onto the foam roller. If you place sustained pressure on one body part, you might actually hit a nerve or damage the tissue, which can cause bruising. Instead, spend 20 seconds on each tender spot then move on. You can also manage how much body weight you use. For example, when working your IT band, plant the foot of your leg on the floor to take some of the weight off the roller.

Mistake #4: You have bad posture. What does your posture have to do with foam rolling? A lot. You have to hold your body in certain positions over the roller and that requires a lot of strength. When rolling out the IT band, you are supporting your upper body weight with one arm. When you roll out the quads, you are essentially holding a plank position. If you don’t pay attention to your form or posture, you may cause more harm. Work with an experienced personal trainer, physical therapist or coach who can show you proper form and technique. Or, consider setting up your smartphone to videotape yourself while foam rolling, that way, you can see what you are doing right and what you are doing wrong, like sagging in the hips or contorting the spine.

Mistake #5: You use the foam roller on your lower back…don’t! You can use the foam roller on your upper back because the shoulder blades and muscles protect the spine. Once you hit the end of the rib cage, stop. If you want to release your lower back, try child’s pose or foam roll the muscles that connect to your lower back — the piriformis (a muscle located deep within the glutes), hip flexors and the main muscles in your quads.

Foam rollers can be your best friend but also your worst enemy. If you’re interested in adding another tool to your workout arsenal, the foam roller may be what you’re looking for. Not only will it help strengthen your muscles, it can also improve your stability and provide muscle relief, however, just be sure you know before you roll.

If you are looking for help with any area of your fitness and/or nutrition, feel free to contact us at 770-330-2126 or email info@bodyrich.com.

Paula Jamieson

Certified Personal Trainer, Fitness Nutritionist, Exercise Therapy Specialist

Bodyrich Fitness Company

www.bodyrichfitness.com

 

SUPER FRESH SPRING SALAD

Check out this delicious and nutritious spring salad that can be used as a great side salad, perfect for spring picnics or add some protein such as chicken, salmon or shrimp for a healthy and hearty dinner salad.

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Super Fresh Spring Salad

Ingredients:

1 pinch coarse salt and freshly ground pepper

1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil

5 mint leaves

1 tablespoon crumbled goat cheese

¼ cup pumpkin seeds or sunflower seeds toasted

3 medium strawberries, rinsed and thinly sliced

5 spears asparagus, ends trimmed and sliced into 2-inch pieces

2 cups baby spinach

Directions:

Bring a small pot of salted water to a boil. Add the asparagus and cook until it pops in color, 2 minutes. Using a slotted spoon transfer immediately to an ice bath. Once cooled, remove and pat dry.

Using a food processor, crush or combine the mint leaves with the salt, oil and lemon juice until blended well and you have a dressing.

Arrange the greens in a bowl or on a plate. Top with sliced strawberries, blanched asparagus, toasted seeds, crumbled goat cheese and a good drizzle of the lemon/mint dressing.

Serve immediately.

Optional: Add some grilled chicken or salmon for a super healthy dinner salad


As always we offer a free consultation and introductory workout.  We would love to help you meet your fitness goals, contact us at 770-330-2126 or email info@bodyrich.com.

Paula Jamieson

Certified Personal Trainer, Fitness Nutritionist, Exercise Therapy Specialist

Bodyrich Fitness Company

www.bodyrichfitness.com

 

2016’S TOP 5 SPRING FITNESS TRENDS

Spring is in full bloom – with longer days and warmer temps there’s no better time of year then now to rev up your fitness.  Check out the top 5 Spring fitness trends for 2016.

Wearable Technology:  This trend, in its first year, has already made its way to the top of the list. The term “wearable technology” includes everything from activity trackers, smart watches to heart rate monitors. A study by the University of Chicago recently came to the conclusion that tracking your steps, calories burned or analyzing your sleep can make you happy. People who track their steps (and compare this number with their partner or friends) are more motivated to increase their steps the next day. Fitness trackers accompany you around the clock and help you lead a more active and healthier lifestyle.

Bodyweight Training: Have you ever heard of bodyweight training, i.e. training with your own body weight? This trend has appeared on the list of top fitness trends for the last two years and is probably so popular because you can do the workouts anytime, anywhere. No equipment is necessary so no excuses when you are traveling not to workout. Body weight resistance is a good exercise to keep your core and stabilizer muscles and tendons in check and strong. Some examples: push-ups, burpees, crunches, lunges, squats, etc.

High-Intensity Interval Training (HIIT): Are you looking to put on muscle and lose weight? An effective and fast way to achieve these goals is high-intensity interval training. The workout consists of intervals with short and intense exercises. A HIIT training session usually lasts less than 30 minutes. Thus, it’s perfect for all those with a busy schedule. It can be a walk with short run spurts; circuit of weights and cardio; bodyweight training with plyometric bursts, etc.

Exercise and Weight Loss: According to the annual survey of the American College of Sports Medicine the combination of exercise and weight loss is probably the most common and stead-fast fitness trend each year. We are all so sure that regular exercise is good for your body, but don’t forget that the right nutrition is important for achieving lasting results – as the saying goes, abs are made in the kitchen. The main thing is to give your body time, it is the only way to achieve long-lasting results and to avoid the yo-yo effect. Fad diets, powders and fasts do give temporary results but to have real, lasting results you need to eat a variety of good foods and exercise. Also, you want to track your weight loss progress by the composition of muscle mass, fat and water – the number on the scale is not always the entire story as muscle weighs more than fat.

Yoga: It doesn’t matter what type of yoga – power yoga, Pilates, hot yoga, bikram yoga etc. this fitness trend has been around for years. Yoga keeps the body lengthened and strong and it is also great for people who run to help keep them injury free by keeping their core tight, strengthening deep muscles and helping with muscle balance and strength. Check out the following link for great yoga poses that can be incorporated into your cool-down after your run. https://www.runtastic.com/blog/en/guest-bloggers/10-yoga-exercises-you-can-do-after-running-part-i/

As always we offer a free consultation and introductory workout.  We would love to help you meet your fitness goals, contact us at 770-330-2126 or email info@bodyrich.com.

Paula Jamieson

Certified Personal Trainer, Fitness Nutritionist, Exercise Therapy Specialist

Bodyrich Fitness Company

www.bodyrichfitness.com